Clem Snide: Forever Just Beyond

This comeback album, assisted by Scott Avett, feels both charmingly at ease and refreshingly ambitious, grappling with life’s big questions over understated, easygoing production.

Jessie Reyez: Before Love Came to Kill Us

The powerhouse singer’s voice is chameleonic and present in every guise. Her debut is most satisfying not because she whizzes across multiple genres, but because of the skill she displays at each.

Hailu Mergia: Yene Mircha

PARTYNEXTDOOR: PARTYMOBILE

The Toronto singer’s writing lacks the specificity that animates his best music this time around.

金曜は魚、木曜はニョッキ、土曜はトリッパで日曜は肉

“ピッコリ・スプンティーニ”シリーズの本、今日紹介するのは
ジョヴェディ・ニョッキ
偶然だけど、今日は木曜日だから、この本の紹介をするにはぴったり。

このシリーズは、お手頃価格の小型の本ですが、とても手をかけて丁寧に作られています。
この本の表紙の、母と娘が一緒にニョッキの生地をこねている写真も、本を読むと、これは著者とその祖母が毎週ニョッキを作る時の思い出の光景だったことがわかります。

“Giovedi gnochhi/木曜はニョッキ”というのは、ローマの定番の言い回し。
さらにvenerdi pesce/金曜は魚、sabato trippa/土曜はトリッパ、とも言います。

まず最初にあるのは、キリスト教では金曜日は肉食を断つ断食の日、だから金曜は魚の日です。

肉食系の人にとって、魚だけで過ごす週末は、エネルギーやボリューム的になんとも心もとない。
そこで、前日にニョッキを食べてエネルギーを補おう、というのでした。

さらに言えば、日曜日のプランゾ。
日曜日は、イタリアでは、家族が全員揃って手の込んだご馳走を食べる日でした。
なので、月、火、水などの週の前半は、このご馳走の残り物をやりくりして賄います。
日曜のプランゾ用に肉が売れるのが土曜日、なので、土曜日は残った内臓(トリッパ)の日だったのです。
週の中日の木曜日は、ちょうどボリュームのある食事を取りたくなる頃だったのでした。

ただ、著者も書いてますが、これは戦後に広まった習慣で、家庭によってはニョッキの日が日曜だったりもしました。

ローマのニョッキの定番ソースはトマトからコーダ・アッラ・ヴァッチナーラまで各種あります。

そう言えば、スーパーの棚のパスタがスカスカになってることに今頃気がついた私は、そんな時はじゃがいもでニョッキを作ればいいと思ったのでした。

じゃがいものニョッキのトマトソースGNOCCHI DI PATATE  AL POMODORO

・じゃがいも1kgをゆでて潰し、台に広げて冷ます。
・その間にソースを作る。
・玉ねぎ1/2個、セロリ1本、にんじん1本のみじん切りを油でソッフリットにし、塩、こしょうする。
・トマトのパッサータ1リットルと水少々を加えて15~20分煮る。好みで唐辛子少々とバジリコを加えてもよい。
・潰したじゃがいもをフォンタナに盛り、卵2個、おろしたパルミジャーノ40g、ナツメグ(好みで)を混ぜる。0番の小麦粉400gを加えながらこねる。
・まとまった生地になったら一部ずつ棒状に伸ばし、短く切る。
・熱湯に入れて2分ゆで、浮かび上がったら取り出す。
・トマトソースに入れてなじませる。

基本のトマトソースなので、パスタなど、何にでも応用できます。
では、次回は本のリチェッタを訳してみます。


-------------------------------------------------------
総合解説
ジョヴェディ・ニョッキ
 [creapasso.comへ戻る]
 =====================================

Lounging Seals, a Ravenous Pelican, and a Startled Owl Top Impressive Entries in Nature Photography Contest

Florian Ledoux’s “Above the Crabeater Seals,” taken in Antarctica with Phantom 4 Pro+. Aerial view of crabeater seals resting in a group on the ice after feeding at night. “The aerial view allow(s) us to better understand how the wildlife use the ice to rest and give birth,” Ledoux. Image © Nature TTL/Florian Ledoux

Replete with stunning shots of Tuscan farmland and close-ups with spiders that reveal their prickly legs, the Nature TTL Photographer of the Year competition garnered an impressive array of images from creatives in 117 countries. Out of the 7,000 entries, Florian Ledoux won the top prize in the annual contest with his aerial photograph capturing nearly two-dozen seals resting on an ice mass floating in Antarctic waters. Categories range from wildlife and landscape to macro, providing an expansive look at nature’s most impressive qualities and characters—Caitlin Henderson exposes a Lichen Huntsman spider that’s attempting to disguise itself on teal-speckled tree bark, while Paul Holman serendipitously captures a fluffy owl in the midst of a surprise. We’ve gathered some of the entries below, but for a complete look at all the Nature TTL winners, check out the contest’s site and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

Robert Ferguson’s “I’m not going easy,” using Singapore using Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, 200-400mm f/4. “This is the Great white pelican (Pelecanus onocrotalus), struggling with a non-native fish. These wonderful birds are free to roam, but have established a large colony on one of the artificial islands in the old Jurong park in Singapore. I had set up my camera to take some portraits and watch their behaviour, and noticed one particular bird that had caught one of the big fish from the pond. I watched, intrigued, as the bird swam in circles, dipping his bill, taking water, then raising his beak to attempt to swallow his large prey. But every time the fish extended its sharp spines on its fins – you can see it hooked on the beak here – and lodged itself firmly. This went on for over 20 minutes, with no sign of either party tiring. I was fascinated to see the intricate veins in the bird’s throat pouch, as the overcast day backlit the thin skin, and I had to move and crouch low to the ground to get the shot,” said Ferguson. Image © Nature TTL/Robert Ferguson

Dipanjan Pal’s “Coexistence,” taken in Iceland using DJI Mavic Pro. “This is a scene very close to one of the popular mountains of Iceland. While flying my drone to the mountain with my drone’s camera pointed downward, I suddenly noticed this beautiful landscape with the blue river perfectly popping against the black sand. The sun peeking through the clouds added more drama to the scene,” said Pal. Image © Nature TTL/Dipanjan Pal

Paul Holman’s “Startled Owl,” taken in the U.K. using a Canon 7d II, Canon EF100-400 Mark II. “The baby little owl made an appearance within the window during a burst of early morning sun. A couple of jackdaws spooked by his presence started dive bombing him. After a few passes I noticed the jackdaw’s reflection in the adjacent windowpane and decided to try and capture this behaviour. The startled look on the little owl’s face adds a little humour to the image,” said Holman. Image © Nature TTL/Paul Holman

Tamás Koncz-Bisztricz’s “The Cradle of Life,” taken in Hungary using DJI FC300C. “Late winter in February, the soda lakes are full of life in Hungary. These lakes are the sanctuary of wide variety water birds. There is a nice, but unknown, hidden lake between the village of Tömörkény and Pálmonostora which is surrounded and covered with cane and sedge – therefore impossible to observe. I took this aerial photograph by a remotely controlled drone. I use a special technique to slowly approach the birds from very high altitude, which is a method also used by conservation experts to count the population of the birds. In the picture the wild ducks roil in the muddy water and leave lines in the yellowish-brownish, sometimes purple, water coloured by organic materials coming from decomposition of cane. The sparkling colour pallet of the image is composed by the blue sky and the white cloud reflection on the water’s surface,” said Koncz-Bisztricz. Image © Nature TTL/Tamás Koncz-Bisztricz

Jesslyn Saw’s “Home Sweet Home,” taken in Malaysia using Olympus EM5 mark II + 60mm f2.8 macro lens. “While on holiday at my family home in Malaysia, I set out to document as many different types of jumping spiders as possible in a fortnight. Battling the rain and heat and humidity of the tropics, the best time to hunt these spiders was early in the morning and late afternoon. It was on one of these late afternoon jaunts that I saw this colourful jumping spider and discovered a nest nearby. Hoping that the nest belonged to this particular spider, I came back again early the next morning to photograph it in its nest. To my delight, I saw that the nest did indeed belong to this spider. However, it took me another two days of early morning visits to finally successfully photograph the spider in its nest,” said Saw. Image © Nature TTL/Jesslyn Saw

Left: Minghui Yuan’s “Chinese Painting,” taken in China using NIKON D7000, Tamron 180mm/3.5 macro lens. “I was wearing a piece of waterproof overalls in the stream of Dabie Mountain, waiting to observe this Matrona basilaris (damselfly). Matrona basilaris is the king of the stream here. There is a male Matrona basilaris every 3 meters. They were waiting for the female to fly over its territory; the male chased away a male opponent and then stopped at the tip of the grass. Against the background of the sky, I discovered the connection between the lines of the grass and the subject. Nature itself is a simple painting,” said Yuan. Image © Nature TTL/Minghui Yuan. Right: Caitlin Henderson’s “Nothing here but this tree,” taken in Australia using Canon 7D, Canon 60mm macro lens. “The Lichen Huntsman (Pandercetes gracilis) is an incredible species of tree-dwelling spider from Australia’s tropical north. Its astounding camouflage enables it to blend perfectly with the tree bark and lichens, and is near impossible to spot by day.
At night, I went searching for these spiders with a torch, using their reflective eye-shine to discover their hiding places in plain sight,” said Henderson. Image © Nature TTL/Caitlin Henderson

Marek Biegalski’s “Shadow game,” taken in Italy using DJI Mavic Pro 2. “Aerial image taken in Tuscany in autumn light. (A) flock of sheep was hiding in the shade from the sun under the shadow of a tree,” said Beigalski. Image © Nature TTL/Marek Biegalski

 

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Cut Your Own Vinyl with this DIY Record Engraver and Player Designed by Yuri Suzuki

All images © Yuri Suzuki

Making mixtapes and burning CDs might be a forgotten pastime, but the days of simple, homemade vinyl are just arriving thanks to Yuri Suzuki. The London-based designer, who is also a partner at Pentagram, has created the Easy Record Maker, a small device that makes audio recording straightforward and accessible to the general public.

By plugging in an auxiliary cable or USB and playing audio through a phone or other digital device, the cutting arm receives the sound vibrations and engraves the blank plastic three to four times within a single millimeter. Each side of the 5-inch record takes about four minutes to complete. When ready to play, the machine’s cutting piece should be swapped for the tone arm, which is large enough to accommodate traditional 7-inch EPs.

In an interview with It’s Nice That, Suzuki said that creating a DIY-record engraver has been one of his goals since his teenage days as part of a ska-punk band when he didn’t have the financial resources to use professional recording equipment. While that difficulty persists today, the designer said he also hoped this audio project would encourage users to focus and have fun. “Sound has a strong impact on our emotions and the way we behave, and I always try to create an experience with sound that as many people as possible can relate to,” he said.

The Easy Record Maker is currently available from Gakken in Japan and will be released to U.S. and U.K. audiences in the coming months. For a live demo, head to Suzuki’s Instagram this Friday to check out what he shares on IGTV.

 

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What is cottagecore and why is it taking over TikTok?

cottagecore tiktok fashion community country living

“Put a finger down if you know how to knit, sew, or crochet,” a TikTok video by @cncealingflwrs begins. “Put a finger down if you own more than five sweaters,” she continues. “Put a finger down if you own more than three flower-printed clothing items...  Have flowers or dried flowers around your room…Or love the aesthetic of fungi and mushrooms.” The list goes on before she asks: “How manyhellip;

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