Posts By Nina Corcoran

Stef Chura: Midnight

The Detroit indie rocker’s second album fluctuates between alt-rock and garage pop, turning up her amp and doubling down on her uncompromising style.

Stef Chura: Midnight

The Detroit indie rocker’s second album fluctuates between alt-rock and garage pop, turning up her amp and doubling down on her uncompromising style.

Josephine Wiggs: We Fall

On her debut solo album, the Breeders’ original bassist blends her signature instrument with minimalist electronics and rippling pools of piano, Mellotron, and acoustic guitar.

Laura Stevenson: The Big Freeze

On her fifth solo album, the New York musician both evolves as a singer-songwriter and grows in confidence, addressing heavy emotional themes with candor and grace.

Potty Mouth: SNAFU

Six years after their scrappy debut, the pop-punk band Potty Mouth return with an arena-sized follow up that sounds like a major-label effort without all the compromises.

T-Rextasy: Prehysteria

The New York band’s jangly indie pop is more ambitious than before, but their lyrics too often fail to move beyond low-stakes camp—hardly the radical liberation the band has hinted at delivering.

Ian Sweet: Crush Crusher

After returning to solo status as a bandleader, Jilian Medford drops the spiky singing style that was her trademark, finding a softer delivery within the darkened corners of dream pop.

Weakend Friends: Common Blah

For these alt-rock throwbacks about the causes and effects of bad relationships, it’s the unapologetic singing of Sonia Sturino that’s the secret weapon.