Posts By Christopher Jobson

Going Fishing: A Stop Motion Fishing Excursion Filmed on a Bedroom Desk by Guldies

Swedish animator Guldies (previously) just released his latest stop motion short titled Going Fishing. The entire clip was filmed in his bedroom on a desk requiring 2,500 photographs shot with a Canon EOS 600D. The attention to detail in giving weight to small objects like the bucket, wood, and bobber is extremely well done. See more of Guldies’ work on his YouTube channel. (via Twisted Sifter)

A Top Floor Sprinkler Leak Creates a 21-Story Tower of Icicles on a Chicago Fire Escape

All photos © Andrew Hickey.

Late last week, a bitter cold snap that swept across the U.S. brought temporary chaos to Chicago’s south loop when a sprinkler system failed atop a 21-story hotel and storage facility. Water cascaded down a fire escape and quickly froze into a tower of ice. Street art photographer Andrew Hickey stopped by and captured some shots of the amazing sight before it was cleared up a few hours later.

A Kinetic Block & Marble Track Perfectly Synchronized with Tchaikovsky’s “Waltz of the Flowers”

Minnesota-based maker DoodleChaos made waves across the internet a few months ago when he perfectly synced a custom course from the Line Rider game to Edvard Grieg’s Hall of the Mountain King. As astounding as it was to watch the digital game and audio sync up, he took things a step further by making a series of IRL Rube Goldberg-like contraptions with marbles, blocks, and magnets that plays perfectly with Tchaikovsky’s Waltz of the Flowers. The feat required listening to the waltz hundreds of times which he says resulted in him “going a bit crazy.” If you liked this, also check out YouTube user Kaplamino.

Surreal New Adventures and Absurd Vintage Moments by Paco Pomet

Artist Paco Pomet (previously) continues to channel old vintage snapshots and historical documentation in his delightfully surreal oil paintings. While all of his paintings capture his unmistakable wit, many of the works seem to straddle a fine line between humor and horror. Using a monochrome base, Pomet selectively adds color to highlight the focal point of the narrative and to heighten the vintage, hand-colored photo aesthetic, while playing with elements of scale, and contemporary technology icons.

Pomet lives and works in Grenada, Spain, and is represented by galleries in Spain, the US, and Denmark. He shares snapshots of work and life on Instagram.

Two Biologists Explore the Remote Rainforests of the Ecuadorian Andes to Document Fungi

All photos © Danny Newman and Roo Vandegrift

Biologists estimate that 3.2 million species of fungi may exist on Earth, and of that only around 120,000 are known to science which leaves potentially millions organisms of left to discover, photograph, and document before it’s too late. The majority of undescribed species live in the tropics where mycologists Danny Newman and Roo Vandegrift have traveled extensively to document fungi in regions threatened by climate change and development.

In 2014, the pair traveled to Reserva Los Cedros, one of the last unlogged watersheds on the western slope of the Andes, where they took a few of the samples seen here (additional photos come from discoveries in other parts of Latin America). The reserve has since been declared open for mining by the Ecuadorian government and the habitat that spawned these unusual mushrooms is slated for destruction. “The identification and description of rare or endemic species from the reserve will help demonstrate the value of these habitats and the importance of their conservation,” shares Newman about the project.

As part of a January residency at the University of Oregon, Newman is now working to sequence the DNA of 350 fungi samples found at Reserva Los Cedros and is seeking support from the public to help fund the project at cost. You can see more photos from their discoveries in Ecuador on Mushroom Observer.

The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa

Black Mountain, 2015. Ceramic. 39 2/5 × 31 1/2 × 39 2/5 in

Japanese artist Toru Kurokawa sculpts improbable liquid and biological shapes from a variety of ceramic materials. What begins life as a mere lump of clay, the artist molds and carves into artworks that appear like arrays of honeycomb, undulating coral, or dripping stalactites. Last year Kurokawa had a solo show with Sokyo Gallery titled The Savage Math, and you can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Sophie Gunnol)

A Burst of Deep Sea Fireworks: A Rare Jellyfish Filmed by the E/V Nautilus

Researchers aboard the E/V Nautilus (previously) celebrated the new year with an unlikely guest, a beautiful Halitrephes maasi jellyfish found at a depth of 4,000 feet underwater at the Revillagigedo Archipelago off Baja California, Mexico. The vibrantly hued jellyfish looks like an impressive burst of fireworks when lit, but would otherwise travel in almost completely visual obscurity.

“Radial canals that move nutrients through the jelly’s bell form a starburst pattern that reflects the lights of ROV Hercules with bright splashes of yellow and pink,” the Nautilus crew shares. “But without our lights this gelatinous beauty drifts unseen in the dark.”

You can follow regular discoveries aboard the Nautilus on their frequently updated YouTube channel.
(via Core 77)

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)