Posts By Kate Sierzputowski

A New 1,087-Piece LEGO Set Celebrates NASA’s 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing

Next month marks the 50th anniversary of NASA’s 1969 mission, which landed astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the Moon. To celebrate the semicentennial event, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has teamed up with LEGO to release a 1,087-piece replica of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module. The model is equipped with both descent and ascent features and comes with with a base plate that mimics the surface of the Moon— including embedded square holes that match the astronaut figures’ foot prints. LEGO launched the sale of the model earlier this month. You can find this LEGO set and other NASA-inspired space modules on their website. (via designboom)

 

Wearable Macramé Sculptures by Sandra de Groot Serve as Soft Headpieces and Armor

Dutch artist Sandra de Groot of Atelier CHAOS creates soft sculptures that are displayed on the human body in the form of elaborate headpieces and ornate armor-like tops. The white macramé works are part of her collection titled kNOTs, which combine elements of craft, sculpture, and architecture in wearable works of art. Each of the ropes that composes her textile forms are made of high quality cotton that allows the pieces to maintain their inherent structure and shape. In a statement, de Groot shares, “the sculptures evolve according to an inner logic that is all mine. Only when the sculpture attains a textile form of attraction and becomes self-contained, I literally let go the ropes.”

The artist studied at Minerva Art Academy and currently mentors intern artists and designers at her studio. You can see more of de Groot’s hand-knotted works, as well as her photography, on her website and Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

Candid Charcoal and Oil Paint Portraits of South African Children by Nelson Makamo

Nelson Makamo, "We are Angels with Dirty Faces," all images by Andile Buka

Nelson Makamo, “We are Angels with Dirty Faces,” all documentation by Andile Buka

Johannesburg, South Africa-based artist Nelson Makamo (previously) uses paint and charcoal to create works that capture the candid nature of childhood. His subjects are often South African children, including his 11 year-old cousin Mapule Maoto who is commonly featured in his drawings, watercolors, monotypes, and oil paintings. The gestural pieces aim to present a child’s perspective, with playfully drawn flowers presented in the subjects’ hands or hair and big, round glasses on their faces.

Recently the artist created a new piece of Maoto for the cover of Time Magazine. His solo exhibition, which includes these paintings and more, will be shown at Loo&Lou in Paris through July 27, 2019. You can see more of his paintings of children and other subjects on his website and Instagram.

"A Gaze in Inverse"

“A Gaze in Inverse”

"To Paris with Love"

“To Paris with Love”

"Decoration of the Youth"

“Decoration of the Youth”

"Untitled"

“Untitled”

"Untitled"

“Untitled”

"Women of Coulour"

“Women of Coulour”

Photograph by Solomon Moremong

Stop Motion Cooking Tutorials by Omozoc Transform Sporting Goods and Electronics Into Unconventional Meals

YouTube user omozoc uses common household appliances both inside and out of the kitchen to craft his delightfully creative stop motion “meals.” A baseball glove becomes the bun of a strangely enticing hot dog, while a cracked-open computer mouse makes an unusual batch of scrambled eggs on the top of an open copying machine. Each video is composed of thousands of images compiled by the user, who does not use Photoshop or CGI, and features an array of satisfying sound effects. Watch more of his invented cooking tutorials, like a sushi meal created from a business suit and an iPhone, in the videos below, or on his YouTube channel.

 

Figurative Ceramic Vessels by Claire Partington Combine Animal Traits with Historic and Mythical Characters

Photographs by Tim Bowditch, courtesy of Claire Partington

Photographs by Tim Bowditch, courtesy of Claire Partington

London-based artist Claire Partington creates figurative ceramic vessels steeped in power dynamics and status. Her works often feature removable head stoppers that feature humans and animals, which brings a range and versatility to each glazed character. Her inspiration for the elegant figures comes mostly from European applied art and design styles from the 17th-century onward, yet the pieces blend elements from various centuries and genres. Partington shares with Colossal that she has a “magpie” approach to collecting visual elements from her everyday experience, “equally taking inspiration from a visit to a museum or a walk along my local high street.” To create the works she first coil-builds the vessel, then shapes the object before adding press molded surface decorations and computer-generated enamel decoration over the glaze.

“I started out making my work as illustrations to the folk and fairy stories that had stayed with me from childhood, partly because of the vivid illustrations, but also the gripping and grisly content of the stories and the fantastical human to animal transformations of the protagonists,” Partington explains to Colossal. “I gradually became more interested in the personalities of characters themselves, rather than the narrative alone and began blurring the stories with identifiable historical figures and to exploit the use of clothes to convey messages of power and allegiance or to reinforce or challenge social limitations.”

Partington has an upcoming solo exhibition at Seattle-based Winston Wächter gallery titled The Hunting Party which opens June 8 and runs through July 27, 2019. Her exhibition Taking Tea is currently on view in the Porcelain Room at the Seattle Art Museum through December 6, 2020. Her exhibition explores the dark side of the historical tea industry such as the forced servitude and precarious ocean voyages that occurred during the expansion of the international trade. You can see more of her ceramic sculptures which blend historical characters with fairytales and myths on her website and Instagram.

 

A Responsive Animation by Universal Everything Uses One of 47,000 Variations to Mimic Visitors’ Movements

A new project designed by the global design collective Universal Everything (previously here and here) mimics the unique movements of visitors at the entrance of the exhibition AI: More Than Human at The Barbican in London. Future You presents a non-human animated figure that wiggles, shifts, and bends in tandem with the user, presenting up to 47,000 possible variations in appearance. The animation also evolves alongside the user, becoming more agile as it learns movements specific to the visitor’s body. The exhibition opened earlier this month and runs through August 26, 2019. You can see more animated and responsive works by Universal Everything on their website, Vimeo, and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

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Our Future You installation is now alive at @barbicancentre for #aimorethanhuman

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Advanced Technologies Hide Below the Surface in New Three-Dimensional Collages by Dustin Yellin

"Astronauts Building a Rocket Under the Sea" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16" x 16" x 8.25" and 16" x 15.875" x 8.125"

“Astronauts Building a Rocket Under the Sea” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″ and 16″ x 15.875″ x 8.125″

Brooklyn, New York-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) preserves three-dimensional photo collages in glass bricks to create what he describes as “frozen cinema.” Some of his more recent works feature landscapes only slightly more dramatic than our own natural and manmade world, often with groups of subjects working together to construct grand machines. Humans unite to build rockets under waterfalls and the sea, while a time machine is secretly constructed underneath a car junkyard. No matter the subject, each work explores our fate within the Anthropocene and the lasting impression we will leave on the Earth. You can see more of his scenes encased in glass on his website and Instagram.

"Unicorn Disc" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16" x 16" x 8.25"

“Unicorn Disc” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″

Detail of "Unicorn Disc" (2017)

Detail of “Unicorn Disc” (2017)

"Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall" (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 48.25" x 17.875" x 18.75"

“Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall” (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 48.25″ x 17.875″ x 18.75″

Detail of "Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall" (2018)

Detail of “Building a Rocket Under a Waterfall” (2018)

"Ceremony to Build a Rocket on Floating Disc" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16" x 16" x 8.25"

“Ceremony to Build a Rocket on Floating Disc” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 16″ x 16″ x 8.25″

"Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 15.875" x 15.875" x 7.75"

“Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin, 15.875″ x 15.875″ x 7.75″

Detail of "Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain" (2017)

Detail of “Building a Time Machine in Car Mountain” (2017)

Detail of "Group Sisyphus" (2017)

Detail of “Group Sisyphus” (2017)

"Group Sisyphus" (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16" x 16" x 8"

“Group Sisyphus” (2017), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 16″ x 16″ x 8″

"The Peace of Wild Things" (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 48.25" x 18" x 17.5"

“The Peace of Wild Things” (2018), Glass, collage, acrylic, resin 48.25″ x 18″ x 17.5″

Feathered Skulls by Laurence Le Constant Serve as Objects of Memory Dedicated to Departed Loved Ones

Laurence Le Constant started working with feathers in the early 2000’s while employed as a sequins designer in haute couture workshops throughout Paris. Inquisitive about the meticulous art, she would ask embroiderers and feather workers to teach her the trade during breaks or her lunch hour. After her grandmother passed in 2010 she created her first skull as a memorial, spending hundreds of hours of works selecting and gluing feathers to a resin base. Since this first skull, her other pieces have also served as tools for memory, honoring prominent women in her family and beyond.

“With the series ‘My Lovely Bones,’ I became the Huesera, or the ‘bone lady,'” Le Constant told Colossal. “Like this mythical creature from the Mexican folk tales, which roams the desert to collect bones and bring back life through its singing, I bring the magnified skulls of women back from the afterlife, giving them a new life and a new voice.”

The artist sources feathers from animals farmed for the food industry in Europe and never uses feathers from protected or endangered birds. You can see more of her feather sculptures on her website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)