Posts By Laura Staugaitis

MIT Engineers Design Responsive 3D-Printed Structures Remotely Controlled by Magnets

A new concept for 3D printed structures designed by engineers at MIT can be remotely controlled with magnets. The innovative gadgets include a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, and a sheet that folds itself. The most impressive structure is a spider-like “grabber” that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast enough to catch a passing ball or wrap up and carry small objects. Each piece is created using 3D printable ink infused with tiny magnetic particles that are directed into a uniform orientation via printer nozzle retrofitted with a electromagnet.

Researches believe these magnetic concepts could one day find applications in the realm of medicine similar to implanted stents or pacemakers. “We think in biomedicine this technique will find promising applications,” explains Xuanhe Zhao, the Noyce Career Development Professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. “For example, we could put a structure around a blood vessel to control the pumping of blood, or use a magnet to guide a device through the GI tract to take images, extract tissue samples, clear a blockage, or deliver certain drugs to a specific location. You can design, simulate, and then just print to achieve various functions.” (via digg)

The Mind Reimagined in Paper Brains by Elsa Mora

Paper artist Elsa Mora (previously) contemplates the brain in a new series titled Mindscapes. The collection of eight paper works show birds-eye views of the brain, rendered in different techniques. Carefully layered grey dots, intricate nets of delicate floral designs, embossed squiggles, and colorful stripes that leap off the page all offer a different interpretation of the heady world that is our mind. Mora’s Mindscapes will be shown in her solo exhibition at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon this fall. The show runs from August 29, 2018 to January 20, 2019. You can see more of the artist’s diverse array of paper art on Instagram.

Toy Stories: Portraits of Children and their Toys Around the World

Cun Zi Yi, age 3 – Chongquing, China

Gabriele Galimberti spent more than two years traveling the world, visiting over fifty countries to photograph young children with their toys. The Italian photographer shares in a statement on Toy Stories, “I recorded the spontaneous and natural joy that unites kids despite their diverse backgrounds. Whether the child owns a veritable fleet of miniature cars or a single stuffed monkey, the pride that they have is moving, funny, and thought provoking.”

In addition to documenting the socioeconomic range of families around the world, Galimberti’s colorful portraits capture the unique personalities of each young person before his camera lens. The photographer has published a book, also called Toy Stories, which compiles all of the portraits from this series. His other titles include My Couch is your Couch, about how people live around the world, and In Her Kitchen, which documents grandmothers and their culinary traditions. You can see more of Galimberti’s work and travels on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

Maudy Sibanda, 3 – Kalulushi, Zambia

Gabriel Pascoal, age 3 – Sao Paulo – Brasil

Norden Brahke – age 5 age – Morocco

Alessia Pellegrini, age 5 – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy

Virginia May Salisbury, age 5 – American Fork, Utah

Radhika Vachani, age 6 – Mumbai, India

Noel Hawthorne, age 5 – South Dallas, Texas

Abel Sientes Armas, age 4 – Nopaltepec, Mexico

Naya Gutierrez, age 3 – Managua, Nicaragua

Arafa and Aisha Saleh Aman, age 4 – Bububu, Zanzibar

Ralf Mazulis – age 4 – Riga, Lettonia

The Graceful Movement of Dancing Tulips Showcased by Carl Kleiner

Carl Kleiner creates sleek editorial content for fashion and lifestyle brands, and that sensibility shows in his photo and video series Postures which features artfully arranged tulips. Using minimal metal rods, bent at strategic ends and angles, Kleiner showcases the graceful curves of the flowers’ long necks and gently ruffled petals and leaves. A further sense of movement is instilled through the stop-motion video, which combines still photos of the blossoms’ subtle changes into a dramatic dance. You can see more from the Swedish photographer on Instagram and Vimeo. (via Yellowtrace)

Film credits: Editing by @josephcolley Sound by @ekstrajournal. With assistance from @andrea_portoles

 

New Prismatic Murals by Xomatok Cover the Streets of Lima With Bursts of Color

Purificación (2018)

Visual artist and art director Xomatok (previously) has been busy in Lima, Peru, where he’s outfitted several walls, building facades, and random rock piles with his signature full-spectrum color gradients. The vivid interventions are in the district of Lima called Villa el Salvador, Xomatok shares with Colossal. And although the artist is often commissioned to add his color pops to outdoor areas, the pieces seen here are part of his personal work. You can see more from Xomatok on Instagram.

Detail, Purificación (2018)

Detail, Purificación (2018)

Oscilación (2017)

Luz del Sur (2018)

Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Detail, Espectro de luz Maxin (2018)

Desktop (2016)

Desktop 2 (2016)

Conexo (2018)

New Glowing Dichroic Glass Installations by Chris Wood are Activated by Sunlight

British artist Chris Wood (previously) continues to create sculptural dichroic glass installations. The artist forms seemingly spare geometric shapes in windows and on on white panels, which come to life with streaks of color when hit with sunlight. You can see more of Wood’s work, including large scale installations and commissions, on her website and Instagram. She’ll also be opening her studio for Cambridge Open Studios in July, 2018.

 

Dreamlike Landscapes Grow from Sculptural Portraits by Yuanxing Liang

Wondrously detailed worlds emerge from busts of youthful women in clay sculptures by Chinese artist Yuanxing Liang. Ambling trees, bridges, and temples emerge from the figures’ hairline, fusing realism and fantasy in smooth resin. Despite their complex design, Liang occasionally creates small editions of his sculptures. The artist is a gradute of the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts. You can see more of his intricately wrought fantasy worlds on Weibo. (via My Modern Met)

Dancing in Movies: A Foot-Tapping Montage of Cinema Scenes


Despite the incredibly vast array of mood and subject matter of films throughout the ages, dancing is a universal dramatic device used to create moments of levity, romance, and drama. Casper Langbak of CLS videos created a delightful super-edit of nearly 300 dance scenes in movies ranging from La La Land to Schindler’s List. You can see a full list of the clips here. Langbak has a large catalogue of cinematic collections and tributes, like Meet the Hero, on YouTube.