Posts By Laura Staugaitis

Abstracted Street Puddles Awash in Neon by Slava Semeniuta

Photographer and artist Slava Semeniuta, who goes by the name Local Preacher, recently noticed the glimmering reflective beauty of the streets of Sochi after an evening rain. As the artist tells Colossal, he had his camera handy and was able to “show the hidden beauty under our feet.” The series of dramatically-colored photographs isolates neon shop window reflections in puddles and potholes and transforms the captured moments into otherworldly landscapes. Semeniuta is based in Sochi, Russia, and shares his work on Behance and Instagram.

New Cross-Stitched Domestic Objects by Ulla Stina Wikander

Underneath each of cross-stitch artist Ulla Stina Wikander's cross-stitched objects is a real, once-functioning appliance, accessory, or tool. Wikander (previously) tends to select objects with traditional associations to domestic life, like sewing machines, ironing boards, and hair dryers. The artist, who is based in Switzerland, combines the retired objects with historical cross-stitch patterns, which she also collects. Each piece is finished with colorful rick-rack detailing to help define the edges and describe the original shape. Wikander recently updated her website with many new works, and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via Cross Connect)

Stairstep Chocolates Designed by Universal Favourite Stack into Cubes of Complementary Flavors

Anyone who’s looked down and realized their plate is all beige has felt the full force of the role of color in what we eat. Universal Favourite takes the visual element to another level with their modular Complements chocolate. The Australian design studio created the project as a client gift and developed it into a collaboration with sweets experts Bakedown Cakery. Each modular staircase-shaped chocolate (blackcurrant, cherry, cookies and cream, fairy floss, lemon, matcha, pistachio, shortbread, single origin dark, strawberry, vanilla, and watermelon) fits together with a complementary flavor to form a very visually appealing cube. Bakedown also shares their handiwork on Instagram, as does Universal Favourite. (via Ignant)

Frenetic Animal Murals by Dzia Swirl to Life Across the World

Since we last checked in with Antwerp-based street artist Dzia (previously), the Belgian muralist has been busy adding fauna flair to walls in an increasingly widening swath across the globe. Recent projects have taken him to China, Norway, and Spain. Dzia, who is classically trained with a masters in fine art at the Royal Academy in Antwerp, primarily depicts wild animals — foxes and birds seem to be recurring favorites. His unique style creates a mosaic of colors following the contours of the animal’s form. In his more recent work, Dzia has begun to add tonal shading within each defined area, adding a sense of volume to the well-defined figures. You can follow his work and travels on Instagram.

New in The Colossal Shop: LINK Collective’s Glow-in-the-Dark Tokyo Furoshiki Scarf


Famed for its radiant skyline at night, Tokyo glows on The LINK Collective’s newest addition to their modern furoshiki line. Featuring a special soft touch glow-in-the-dark paint, the design by Hannah Waldron captures the Japanese megalopolis’s towering architecture in a contemporary, slightly abstracted design. Mount Fuji and a star-spangled sky watch over the city on a background of cerulean blue, accented with red and white. Throughout the day, the glow-in-the-dark paint absorbs ambient light, and at night the city’s windows, light up.

Furoshiki, the classic Japanese square textile, are meant to be used for a variety of purposes from wrapping packages to picnic blankets and of course, as a scarf. The LINK Collective works with Japanese craftsmen and artists from around the world for their line of hand-made furoshiki. Tokyo and other designs are available in The Colossal Shop.

Colorful Portraits of Adoptable Dogs Photographed by Paul Octavious

Photographer Paul Octavious (previously) casts new light on Chicago’s adoptable dogs through a collaboration with PAWS, the city’s largest no-kill animal shelter. Octavious, an editorial and commercial photographer, explained to Colossal that he was on a shoot for NBC when he thought to pair the vibrant HUE lighting setup with rescue pups that were set to be photographed with characters from a NBC TV show. Octavious ended up spotlighting the animals themselves with the HUE lighting, resulting in these colorful portraits, and he has continued to volunteer his time helping to get Chicago’s homeless pets adopted with his ResHue Dog series. You can follow Paul on Instagram and learn more about available pets at PAWS.

New Sculptures by Ben Young Transform Hand-Cut Glass into Aquatic Landscapes


Ben Young (previously here) continues to use exquisite manual techniques to transform sheets of glass into luminous sculptures that give a glimpse into a moment in time or space. The artist envisions, hand-cuts, and carefully constructs layers of glass to evoke water, often offset with organically-shaped concrete topography, as well as metal details like a diver, lighthouse, or sailboat. Young, who is based in New Zealand, describes his latest body of work on his website:

Sentiments of the Sublime explores the nostalgic many and collective perspectives of the relationship between man and nature. In creating work, by hand, that makes reference to the myriad of perspectives and experiences of others, Young’s work is both deeply personal to the viewer and at the same time exploring subject matter that is universal, connecting Young, his work and his viewers in a moment of awe and nostalgia.

Young recently had his first solo show at REDSEA Gallery in Singapore, and currently has a piece, At The Helm, on view at Black Door Gallery in Aukland. Young also offers prints of his sculptures and shares updates on his work via BehanceFacebook, and Instagram.

Tatsuya Tanaka Continues Building Tiny Worlds in his Daily Miniature Calendar Photo Project

Since April 2011, art director and photographer Tatsuya Tanaka’s imagination has built a magnificent number of miniature worlds (previously here and here). Through the artist’s clever lens, everyday activities like construction work, walking the dog, getting a parking ticket, and plowing through a blizzard become delight-inducing scenarios. Tanaka also plays with pop culture references, building staple skyscrapers for Godzilla to prowl.

You can see more from Tanaka’s ongoing Miniature Calendar project on Instagram, where he shares his creations each and every day. With over two thousand scenes and counting, he has garnered an impressive followership of a million people. In August, Tanaka also released a book of his work, Small Wonders – Life Portrait in Miniature. (via Tu Recepcja)