Posts By Laura Staugaitis

Intricate Geometric Patterns Hand-Pressed Into Aluminum Cans

Sculptor Noah Deledda transforms everyday aluminum cans into works of art using nothing but his fingertips. Deledda carefully presses and creases intricate geometric patterns into the surface of plain cylindrical cans using carefully placed pressure from his fingers and the edge of his nails. The artist explains in a statement on his site, “Through sculpture I try to create something unique out of an ordinary object. In this case, a common disposable object. The technique itself also embodies this theme of elevation by implementing the incidental gestures of disposal, the ‘scratch, dent and crease.’ Through artistic principles these actions are re-imagined.” Deledda shares process videos on Instagram and his website, where his sculptural vessels are also available for purchase. (via The Kid Should See This)

News You Can Use: Score $800 of Good Stuff From Colossal, Booooooom, and 20×200

“Cemetery Rd, 3169-3327, Viewmont, NY” by Pete Mauney. Available exclusively through 20×200

In partnership with our comrades-in-arts, Booooooom and 20×200, we’re giving you a chance to win a $300 credit in The Colossal Shop, $300 to spend on art at 20×200.com, and two years of membership plus some sweet swag from Booooooom. You can sign up for the giveaway right here. It’s totally free to participate, and by entering to win you’ll be signed up for Colossal’s Daily newsletter, as well as news from 20×200 and Booooooom’s Secret Email Club.

20×200, which has been selling art online since 2007, offers a curated collection of limited-edition, museum-quality prints and artworks by emerging, established, and legendary artists. It’s art for everyone! Colossal picked out one of our favorite images, a magical capture of fireflies at night in upstate New York by photographer Pete Mauney as an example above. (See some of our other editor’s picks here.) It’s just one of hundreds of artworks by present and past photographers, fine artists, designers, and printmakers in 20×200’s impressive roster, from Debbie Millman and Paul Octavious to Dorthea Lange and Ansel Adams. With your $300 credit, you can load up on small, unframed prints, or invest in a larger work with a custom frame (an add-on service 20×200 conveniently provides).

With a two-year membership to Booooooom, you’ll get unlimited submissions for editorial features, exclusive creative commissionsand other opportunities available only to members. And if that’s not enough, membership also gives you access to Booooooom’s private slack community, where you can connect with creatives and art-lovers for advice, support, feedback, and idea-sharing. Oh, and did we mention you’ll get a swag pack, too? A branded T-shirt, cap, stickers, and camera strap are all included.

For over ten years, Booooooom has been an influential voice in the emerging art scene, dedicated to promoting the best young artists. Founded by Vancouver based writer and curator Jeff Hamada, Booooooom has published over 12,000 articles with a focus on photography and illustration, and works as a connector between creatives and brands, galleries, and festivals around the world.  Booooooom got started a couple years before Colossal, and it’s been a privilege to learn and grow alongside them for the past eight years (you can even read a fun interview we did together here).

Plus, with $300 to burn in The Colossal Shop, you can pick up books on art and creativity, quirky toys, quality art supplies, and beautifully made design objects, many of which have been featured on Colossal. And we heard something about gift-giving season coming up…

Enter to win! 

 

System 001: An Innovative Design to Remove Plastic From the Ocean has Been Deployed off the Coast of California

Founded in 2013 by 18-year-old (at the time) inventor Boyan Slat, The Ocean Cleanup is a nonprofit organization that’s working to clean up our oceans by removing plastic. After five years of rigorous design and testing, the Cleanup’s cleaning apparatus, called System 001, has been deployed off the coast of California.

System 001 is a passive collection apparatus that works by moving in tandem with the ocean’s currents, taking advantage of the water’s circular movement patterns, called gyres, that cause the trash to accumulate in the first place. The Ocean Cleanup points out that 92% of the debris in the Patch is still large enough to be collected using the System’s large suspended net, and it’s critical to remove this plastic now before it degrades into microplastics that enter the food chain. Because of the net’s passive, slow-moving design, the group has reported that it has not caused animals to get caught, presumably because they have sufficient time and space to navigate away from the debris-funneling nets.

While the organization has global aspirations and an international team (the founder is Dutch), their first focus is on the massive Pacific Garbage Patch, which floats in the ocean between California and Hawaii. The Pacific Garbage Patch is the largest aquatic aggregation of trash in the world, first recognized thirty years ago. It is estimated to contain about 80,000 metric tons of garbage spanning 5.2 billion square feet (nearly a million square miles). Ocean Cleanup’s boat, the Maersk Launcher, towed the System 1,200 miles from Alameda to begin its work.

You can see a live update of the System’s location and learn more about The Ocean Cleanup on the organization’s website, as well as on Twitter and Instagram.

  

Dramatic Perspectives Capture Uniquely Juxtaposed Beachgoers in Street Photography by Moises Levy

Giant 1

Giant 1, all images via Moises Levy

Mexico City-based photographer and architect Moises Levy captures unique moments of human and animal interaction in his street photography, most often centered around activities at the beach. By shooting at a low angle, Levy captures slackline and tightrope walkers in the frame of someone’s legs, or a horse at just the right pace to make it seems as if a woman has walked directly underneath its snout. All of his images are backlit to create high contrast black and white images that present his figures more as silhouettes than subjects. You can see more of his beach photography on Instagram.

Funny Feet

Funny Feet

Above

Above

Trapped

Trapped

Levitation

Levitation

Horse 1

Horse 1

Hungry Dog

Hungry Dog

Top of the World

Top of the World

Horse 2

Gime Five

Gime Five

A Dizzying Visual Experiment Animates 19 Hours of Single-Shot Video

In a new music video for the musician and DJ Max Cooper (previously), Páraic McGloughlin (previously) turns a single viewpoint over an anonymous highway into a nearly five-minute-long psychedelic collage. The Irish film director was tasked with “visualizing the Platonic realm of form underlying reality,” writes Cooper in a statement about the video. To do so McGloughlin situated himself on a bridge in Sligo, Ireland for 19 hours, to create a single, day-long shot that he then manipulated. The final result is a dizzying mashup of visual effects. Grids, spirals, and pixels  composed of the original video footage flash and swirl across the screen, showing the viewer snapshots of the sky, highway, and grassy hills.

“Aesthetically I love the mix of abstraction and realism and this was a great place for me to explore this,” McGloughlin shares. “Using a fundamental image (a time lapse) to mask and cut into, I tried to show the variable possibilities within a limited time span, maintaining the integrity of each individual photograph while dissecting and rearranging the overall image.” The visual content was matched with each layer of audio created by Cooper to form the song, which stacks up to over one hundred layers. You can watch more videos from McGloughlin on Vimeo, and discover Cooper’s music on his website and SoundCloud. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Hand-Tufted Rugs Celebrate the Natural Beauty of Lichen and Mold

Dutch artist Lizan Freijsen explores our relationship to fungi, stains, mold, and moisture through modes of interior design. Freijsen creates rugs (as well as wallpapers and blankets) that mimic the unique patterns of natural formations in states of growth and decay. Each carpet has its own shape and color palette, and is comprised of concentric rings—some with eccentrically squiggling edges and others with more simple circles.

To produce these often large-scale textiles, Freijsen partners with Hester Onijs and Karen Zeedijk at the Textile Museum in Tilburg, NL. In addition to her own art practice, Freijsen has been teaching at the Willem De Kooning Academy in Rotterdam since 2000. You can see more of her work and peruse rugs that are available for purchase on her website.

Striking Aerial Photographs of Namibia’s Arid Landscape Appear as Abstract Paintings

Australian photographer Leah Kennedy captured Namibia’s colorful, dry topography on a recent aerial safari. Much of the artist’s work is aerial, which satisfies her creative affinity for combining abstraction and duality in her photography. Kennedy traveled in a Cessna light aircraft, as well as in a helicopter sans doors, using a medium format camera. She shares with Colossal, “The resulting images are, at least temporarily, removed from their reality they take on different forms and in some cases appear to be of microscopic origins or reminiscent of something else entirely. This ambiguity and departure from reality is what intrigues and inspires my work.”

In addition to her fine art portfolio, Kennedy teaches workshops and offers tutorials on photography and Photoshop. You can see more of her site-specific series and purchase prints of select photographs on Kennedy’s website, and follow her work and travels on Instagram.

Air Sea Land: Okuda’s Largest Public Art Project Brings Colorful Sculptures to the Streets of Boston

Seven towering sculptures comprised of brightly colored facets have recently landed on the streets of Boston, courtesy of Okuda San Miguel. The multi-disciplinary Spanish artist, best known for his colorful interventions in and on buildings around the world, installed the series of seven sculptures called Air Sea Land in Boston’s seaport corridor. Okuda’s creations range from eight to twelve feet tall, and include regional wildlife like deer and squirrels, while also integrating mythological elements like a scaly humanoid sea creature and a seagull with arms and legs. Air Sea Land which is Okuda’s largest public art project to date, was curated by Justkids. You can see more from Okuda on Instagram.