Posts in Category: sculpture

Artist Spotlight: Bayne Peterson

Sculptures by California-born, Rhode Island-based artist Bayne Peterson. See more below. All images courtesy of the Artist and Kristen Lorello, NY. Photographed by Jeffrey Sturges.

 

Bayne Peterson

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

Porous Boulder-Like Sculptures Chiseled from Italian Marble by Sibylle Pasche

Swiss sculptor Sibylle Pasche transforms large segments of Italian marble into boulder-like sculptures which are covered in a porous web. These holes provide a peak inside the works’ complex interiors while also evoking the structure of a capillary system or the dense composition of a sea sponge. These openings visually conflict with the density and weight of her chosen material, which can often weigh up to several tons.

Pasche was born in Switzerland and studied art at the Liceo Artistico in Zurich. She currently keeps two European spaces for her work, splitting time between her studios in Switzerland and Carrara, Italy. You can see more of her large, sculptural forms on her Facebook and website.

Martin C. Herbst’s Transfigurative ‘Sphere’ Sculptures

Martin C. Herbst's “Spheres” are transforming, painted faces on stainless steel spheres, seemingly shifting expressions as viewers move the pieces or their perspectives. The artist was inspired by Parmigianino’s 1500s painting “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror," known for its distorted effect. Herbst was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

New Cross-Stitched Domestic Objects by Ulla Stina Wikander

Underneath each of cross-stitch artist Ulla Stina Wikander's cross-stitched objects is a real, once-functioning appliance, accessory, or tool. Wikander (previously) tends to select objects with traditional associations to domestic life, like sewing machines, ironing boards, and hair dryers. The artist, who is based in Switzerland, combines the retired objects with historical cross-stitch patterns, which she also collects. Each piece is finished with colorful rick-rack detailing to help define the edges and describe the original shape. Wikander recently updated her website with many new works, and you can also follow her on Instagram. (via Cross Connect)

The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa

Black Mountain, 2015. Ceramic. 39 2/5 × 31 1/2 × 39 2/5 in

Japanese artist Toru Kurokawa sculpts improbable liquid and biological shapes from a variety of ceramic materials. What begins life as a mere lump of clay, the artist molds and carves into artworks that appear like arrays of honeycomb, undulating coral, or dripping stalactites. Last year Kurokawa had a solo show with Sokyo Gallery titled The Savage Math, and you can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Sophie Gunnol)

Chiharu Shiota’s Recent ‘Drawings in Space’

Chiharu Shiota has called her thread installations “drawing in space.” Using antique furniture and other objects evoking memory, her work has explored how we're tethered to the past and each other. Shiota's work, and her performance art, has recently taken over spaces at KODE-Art Museum of Bergen in Norway, Museum Nikolaikirche in Berlin, Kenji Taki Gallery in Japan, and SCAD Museum of Art in Georgia. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.