Posts in Category: weather

Breathe: A Stunning Black & White Timelapse of Thunderstorms Across the Central Plains

Phoenix-based filmmaker, photographer, and storm chaser Mike Olbinski captures approaching storms around his desert home using high definition video, often posting his works to his Vimeo in 4K. Breathe, one of his latest short films, is the first ever work posted in 8K and features a selection of storms shot in 2017 in either the American central plains or southwest. Watch the video above in high resolution to witness the magnificence of each rolling stormcell gather and disperse throughout a variety of open landscapes.

You can follow along with Olbinski’s storm chasing adventures on his blog, and see more of his timelapse videos and photography on his website.

San Francisco Shrouded in Dense Fog Captured by Michael Shainblum

In a relentless pursuit to capture the frequently shifting weather patterns of the San Francisco Bay Area, photographer Michael Shainblum (previously) has stalked scenic outlooks around the city for close to a decade. The city is especially famous for dense fog and low-lying stratus clouds that roll in almost daily during the summer, resulting in the surreal scenes he loves to photograph and film. Shainblum shares in a statement about the ongoing body of work:

The Fog in the bay area feels like it has a mind of its own. The fog can often times disturb a beautiful sunny day and cover the sky with darkness. There are mixed feelings about the fog, many residents finding it a huge inconvenience and depressing. Where as many residences embrace the fog and its erratic behavior. Regardless of how the fog is perceived from below. It’s hard to ignore just how incredible it looks from above. This series is a tribute to the incredible fog and a showcase of its magnificent beauty. Fog has essentially become a living breathing entity in San Francisco.

You can see more of his Symphony of Fog series on his website and by following him on Instagram. He also occasionally teaches timelapse workshops and sells prints of his best shots.

 

Transient: An Extraordinary Short Film That Captures Lightning at 1,000 Frames per Second

Filmmaker and photographer Dustin Farrell spent over a month this summer traveling some 20,000 miles for the sole purpose of filming thunderstorms around the United States. Using a pricey Phantom Flex4K high-speed camera he filmed lightning strike after lightning strike at 1,000 frames per second, resulting in the impressive footage that shows the remarkable complexity of electricity in the atmosphere. Most of the footage in the final cut was shot around Farrell’s home state of Arizona.

“Lightning is like a snowflake. Every bolt is different,” shares Farrell. “I learned that lightning varies greatly in speed. There are some incredible looking bolts that I captured that didn’t make the cut because even at 1000fps they only lasted for one frame during playback. I also captured some lightning that appear computer generated it lasted so long on the screen.”

You can catch a few more of his short films here. (via PetaPixel)

A 30-Day Timelapse Transports You Across the Globe Aboard a Container Ship


Jeffrey Tsang is a maritime vlogger, sailor, and photographer on a container ship that travels across the globe. His latest video is a timelapse that captures 30 days of the barge’s journey, tracing its path from the Red Sea all the way to Hong Kong. The 4K video is composed of nearly 80,000 photos which capture breathtaking views of quickly shifting skies, deep red sunsets, and brilliant blue lightening amidst ferocious storms.

“Sailing in the open sea is a truly unique way to grasp how significantly small we are in the beautiful world,” says the Canadian photographer. “Chasing the endless horizon, witnessing the ever changing weather, and appreciating the bright stars and galaxies.”

We highly recommend you watch the video in full screen, a viewing experience that transports you directly to the bow of the globe-trotting ship. You can see more of Tsang’s maritime photography on his Instagram and Youtube. (via Coudal)

Fractal: A Magnificent Supercell Thunderstorm Timelapse by Chad Cowan

For the last decade, Kansas-based photographer Chad Cowan has driven almost 100,000 miles across the United States chasing powerful supercell thunderstorms and recording them in high definition. The endeavor began as a personal project to capture a few storms as they developed but quickly grew into a full-blown obsession. Cowan has recorded hundreds of storms and condensed the highlights into this short film titled Fractal with editing help from Kevin X Barth. He shares about the nature of thunderstorms:

The ingredient based explanation for supercell thunderstorms cites moisture, wind shear, instability and lift as the reasons for their formation. I prefer to focus on the big picture. Supercell thunderstorms are a manifestation of nature’s attempt to correct an extreme imbalance. The ever ongoing effort to reach equilibrium, or viscosity, is what drives all of our weather, and the force with which the atmosphere tries to correct this imbalance is proportional to the gradient. In other words, the more extreme the imbalance, the more extreme the storm.

You can see more of Cowan’s storm photography on his website and on Instagram. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Timelapse Video Captures Rare Full Cloud Inversion Inside the Grand Canyon

Although rare, full cloud inversions are something we know well here, covering the same phenomena over the last few years both here and here. This particular timelapse video by filmmaker Harun Mehmedinovic captures how beautifully the descending clouds imitate waves when trapped within the Grand Canyon, undulating against the uppermost edges of the natural wonder’s deep valley.

The video was filmed as a part of SKYGLOW, a crowdfunded project that seeks to explore the effects of urban light pollution by examining some of the darkest skies across North America. You can see breathtaking stills from the video, which originally premiered on BBC Earth, below. (via PetaPixel)

A House Encased in Ice on the Shores of Lake Ontario

All photos courtesy John Kucko.

Last weekend photographer John Kucko received a tip about a house in Webster, New York that had become encased in ice after a winter storm swept through the area. Arriving on the scene he found what you see here, a resident’s summer home swallowed entirely by wind-swept icicles and sheets of ice. Kucko shares with Colossal that the building rests just 20 feet from the rocky shores of Lake Ontario where winds recorded up to 81mph caused the waves to crash against the small home. You can see a few recent video updates on his Facebook page. (via Twisted Sifter)

Ominous Storms Photographed in Black and White by Mitch Dobrowner

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Regan, North Dakota, 2011

Photographer Mitch Dobrowner travels the U.S. and sets up his camera in front of apocalyptic storms that rise above rural fields in Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Dakota. Inspired by photographers like Minor White and Ansel Adams, he captures breathtaking landscapes that remind us of nature’s raw power by juxtaposing the endless flat plains of the southern and midwest states with dramatic weather formations. Lightning strikes and tornadoes feature heavily in Dobrowner’s black and white images that at times look like moments right out of the first few minutes of the Wizard of Oz.

Dobrowner has exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and internationally since 2005 and is represented by Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe and Kopeikin Gallery in LA. You can see much more of his work on Facebook.

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Bolton, Kansas

Bolton, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

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Arcus Cloud

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Vortex Over Field, 2015

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Strata Storm and Bales, 2015