Posts in Category: Amazing

A Top Floor Sprinkler Leak Creates a 21-Story Tower of Icicles on a Chicago Fire Escape

All photos © Andrew Hickey.

Late last week, a bitter cold snap that swept across the U.S. brought temporary chaos to Chicago’s south loop when a sprinkler system failed atop a 21-story hotel and storage facility. Water cascaded down a fire escape and quickly froze into a tower of ice. Street art photographer Andrew Hickey stopped by and captured some shots of the amazing sight before it was cleared up a few hours later.

A Kinetic Block & Marble Track Perfectly Synchronized with Tchaikovsky’s “Waltz of the Flowers”

Minnesota-based maker DoodleChaos made waves across the internet a few months ago when he perfectly synced a custom course from the Line Rider game to Edvard Grieg’s Hall of the Mountain King. As astounding as it was to watch the digital game and audio sync up, he took things a step further by making a series of IRL Rube Goldberg-like contraptions with marbles, blocks, and magnets that plays perfectly with Tchaikovsky’s Waltz of the Flowers. The feat required listening to the waltz hundreds of times which he says resulted in him “going a bit crazy.” If you liked this, also check out YouTube user Kaplamino.

A Remarkable Timelapse of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch

Last Friday SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket that illuminated the sky above Southern California in a spectacularly unusual way, leaving many unsuspecting people to wonder if they were witnessing a comet, an attack, or the end of days. SpaceX founder Elon Musk acknowledged the bizzare atmospheric effect but didn’t help clarify things much.

Photographer Jesse Watson was in nearby Yuma, Arizona to film a timelapse of the launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base. Having never filmed a rocket before he wasn’t sure quite what to expect, but this 40 seconds of footage was well worth the effort. PetaPixel has some additional details about how Watson managed to get the shot.

Transient: An Extraordinary Short Film That Captures Lightning at 1,000 Frames per Second

Filmmaker and photographer Dustin Farrell spent over a month this summer traveling some 20,000 miles for the sole purpose of filming thunderstorms around the United States. Using a pricey Phantom Flex4K high-speed camera he filmed lightning strike after lightning strike at 1,000 frames per second, resulting in the impressive footage that shows the remarkable complexity of electricity in the atmosphere. Most of the footage in the final cut was shot around Farrell’s home state of Arizona.

“Lightning is like a snowflake. Every bolt is different,” shares Farrell. “I learned that lightning varies greatly in speed. There are some incredible looking bolts that I captured that didn’t make the cut because even at 1000fps they only lasted for one frame during playback. I also captured some lightning that appear computer generated it lasted so long on the screen.”

You can catch a few more of his short films here. (via PetaPixel)

Matereality: A Mesmerizing Short Film of Macro Magnetism Captured by Roman De Giuli

In this mesmerizing new short film, German filmmaker Roman De Giuli worked with magnets, iron filings, reflective pigment, and glitter to create this pulsing visual montage of magnetic special effects titled Matereality. It’s amazing to think this was all done with practical effects and not CGI. Music by Son-J. (via The Awesomer)

Origami Inception: Paper Artist Folds Four Works From a Single Sheet of Paper

Vietnamese paper artist Nguyen Hung Cuong (previously) just unveiled this new origami work titled “Fly High, Dreamers!” that incorporates four sequential objects—a hand holding a crane with a rider also holding a smaller crane—each connected to the other, all from a single uncut sheet of paper. “I created this work to show my deep gratitude to origami community,” Cuong shares. “The boy is myself, and the hand represents all origami creators who inspired me, making my dream come true.” The piece is on view at the Jaffa Museum in Tel Aviv as part of the current Paper Heroes show.

Otherworldly ‘Earth Pyramids’ Captured in the Foggy Early Morning Light by Photographer Kilian Schönberger

Photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) climbed the Alps late at night to capture one of the mountain range’s strangest segments, alien-like columns found in South Tyrol, an autonomous province in Northern Italy. His series Otherworld showcases the so-called “earth pyramids” in a hazy dawn light, strange creations that appear like stalagmites freed from their underground caves.

The structures are created by erosion, rising from clay soil left behind by glaciers from the last Ice Age. Each features a large boulder resting on top which protects the soil below. Eventually the tall columns loose the strength to hold the large rock overhead, shifting balance and sending it tumbling down the mountain.

The otherworldly elements remind Schönberger of the hoodos in the Southwestern United States, however the two naturally occurring wonders are formed from two very different geological processes. You can see more of German landscape photographer’s work on his Instagram and Behance  

Otherworldly ‘Earth Pyramids’ Captured in the Foggy Early Morning Light by Photographer Kilian Schönberger

Photographer Kilian Schönberger (previously) climbed the Alps late at night to capture one of the mountain range’s strangest segments, alien-like columns found in South Tyrol, an autonomous province in Northern Italy. His series Otherworld showcases the so-called “earth pyramids” in a hazy dawn light, strange creations that appear like stalagmites freed from their underground caves.

The structures are created by erosion, rising from clay soil left behind by glaciers from the last Ice Age. Each features a large boulder resting on top which protects the soil below. Eventually the tall columns loose the strength to hold the large rock overhead, shifting balance and sending it tumbling down the mountain.

The otherworldly elements remind Schönberger of the hoodos in the Southwestern United States, however the two naturally occurring wonders are formed from two very different geological processes. You can see more of German landscape photographer’s work on his Instagram and Behance