Posts in Category: Science

Breathe: A Stunning Black & White Timelapse of Thunderstorms Across the Central Plains

Phoenix-based filmmaker, photographer, and storm chaser Mike Olbinski captures approaching storms around his desert home using high definition video, often posting his works to his Vimeo in 4K. Breathe, one of his latest short films, is the first ever work posted in 8K and features a selection of storms shot in 2017 in either the American central plains or southwest. Watch the video above in high resolution to witness the magnificence of each rolling stormcell gather and disperse throughout a variety of open landscapes.

You can follow along with Olbinski’s storm chasing adventures on his blog, and see more of his timelapse videos and photography on his website.

Two Biologists Explore the Remote Rainforests of the Ecuadorian Andes to Document Fungi

All photos © Danny Newman and Roo Vandegrift

Biologists estimate that 3.2 million species of fungi may exist on Earth, and of that only around 120,000 are known to science which leaves potentially millions organisms of left to discover, photograph, and document before it’s too late. The majority of undescribed species live in the tropics where mycologists Danny Newman and Roo Vandegrift have traveled extensively to document fungi in regions threatened by climate change and development.

In 2014, the pair traveled to Reserva Los Cedros, one of the last unlogged watersheds on the western slope of the Andes, where they took a few of the samples seen here (additional photos come from discoveries in other parts of Latin America). The reserve has since been declared open for mining by the Ecuadorian government and the habitat that spawned these unusual mushrooms is slated for destruction. “The identification and description of rare or endemic species from the reserve will help demonstrate the value of these habitats and the importance of their conservation,” shares Newman about the project.

As part of a January residency at the University of Oregon, Newman is now working to sequence the DNA of 350 fungi samples found at Reserva Los Cedros and is seeking support from the public to help fund the project at cost. You can see more photos from their discoveries in Ecuador on Mushroom Observer.

Cable and Satellite Free: How To Cut The Cord In 11 Steps

Cable and satellite companies have long been gouging customers, because buyers didn’t have the option to take control of their airwaves. We were subjected to whatever channels these companies felt like giving us, for whatever price they felt like charging. Then we were emboldened by the Internet. Using digital streaming services, we had the option […]

The post Cable and Satellite Free: How To Cut The Cord In 11 Steps appeared first on TheCoolist.

A Burst of Deep Sea Fireworks: A Rare Jellyfish Filmed by the E/V Nautilus

Researchers aboard the E/V Nautilus (previously) celebrated the new year with an unlikely guest, a beautiful Halitrephes maasi jellyfish found at a depth of 4,000 feet underwater at the Revillagigedo Archipelago off Baja California, Mexico. The vibrantly hued jellyfish looks like an impressive burst of fireworks when lit, but would otherwise travel in almost completely visual obscurity.

“Radial canals that move nutrients through the jelly’s bell form a starburst pattern that reflects the lights of ROV Hercules with bright splashes of yellow and pink,” the Nautilus crew shares. “But without our lights this gelatinous beauty drifts unseen in the dark.”

You can follow regular discoveries aboard the Nautilus on their frequently updated YouTube channel.
(via Core 77)

A Remarkable Timelapse of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Launch

Last Friday SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket that illuminated the sky above Southern California in a spectacularly unusual way, leaving many unsuspecting people to wonder if they were witnessing a comet, an attack, or the end of days. SpaceX founder Elon Musk acknowledged the bizzare atmospheric effect but didn’t help clarify things much.

Photographer Jesse Watson was in nearby Yuma, Arizona to film a timelapse of the launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base. Having never filmed a rocket before he wasn’t sure quite what to expect, but this 40 seconds of footage was well worth the effort. PetaPixel has some additional details about how Watson managed to get the shot.

5 Best Marriage Boot Camps and Couple’s Retreats

To say relationships are difficult is as huge an understatement as saying “life is hard.” Relationships, and especially marriages, are absolute hell on Earth…when it comes to dilemmas and complications. When executed well, a marriage is a masterwork of cooperation, domestic bliss, tandem living, and social support. To see a marriage that functions properly is […]

The post 5 Best Marriage Boot Camps and Couple’s Retreats appeared first on TheCoolist.

12 Fascinating Facts About Your Favorite Foods

You are what you eat, is the weird half-truth that is spat out again and again. Luckily, it’s not entirely accurate, because otherwise we’d all be mint fudge chocolate chip ice cream, smokehouse BBQ, and meat lovers pizza. What is true is that what we put into our bodies dramatically effects the way it operates. […]

The post 12 Fascinating Facts About Your Favorite Foods appeared first on TheCoolist.

Up-Close Images of Jupiter Reveal an Impressionistic Landscape of Swirling Gases

Juno is NASA’s project focused on bringing a deeper understanding to Jupiter and the processes that might have governed our solar system’s creation. The spacecraft was launched in 2011 to explore several facets of the planet’s composition, including its atmosphere, magnetic force field, and dense cloud coverage.

This series of close-up photographs was taken by Juno within the last year, and is a dazzling diverse display of the planet’s gaseous composition. Swirling blue and brown clouds appear like impressionist paint strokes across Jupiter’s atmospheric surface, a spectacle which is constantly shifting into new optically charged formations.

You can see more images taken with Juno’s high-tech cameras on NASA’s website, and submit your own processed images from Juno’s raw image files on Mission Juno. (via Twisted Sifter)