Posts in Category: paper

Omoshiro Block: A Paper Memo Pad That Excavates Objects as It Gets Used

Leave it to the stationery-loving Japanese to come up with a new way to enjoy writing notes. The Omoshiro Block (loosely translated as ‘fun block’) utilizes laser-cutting technology to create what is, at first, just a seemingly normal square cube of paper note cards. But as the note cards get used, an object begins to appear. And you’ll have to exhaust the entire deck of cards to fully excavate the hidden object.

Produced by Japanese company Triad, whose main line of business is producing architectural models, the Omoshiro Blocks feature various notable architectural sites in Japan like Kyoto’s Kiyomizudera Temple, Tokyo’s Asakusa Temple and Tokyo Tower. The blocks are composed of over 100 sheets of paper and each sheet is different from the next in the same way that individual moments stack up together to form a memory.

But despite the declining cost of laser-cutting technology, the Omoshiro Blocks are still quite expensive and range from around 4000 yen to 10,000 yen, depending on their size. Getting your hands on one will also be tricky for the time being as they’re currently only available at the Tokyu Hands Osaka location. But you can keep up with updates from the company by following them on Instagram. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

Yuki Tatsumi Collects Chopstick Sleeve Origami Left Behind at Restaurants

“Japanese Tip” is an art project by Yuki Tatsumi made up of thousands of paper sculptures made from the sleeves used to wrap chopsticks at restaurants. Having worked as a waiter, Tatsumi noticed customers would often fold the tiny bits of paper into intricate miniature artworks.

The custom of tipping doesn’t exist in Japanese culture but Tatsumi took these origamic offerings as a subconscious show of appreciation. In addition to saving ones he came across on his own, he also reached out to other restaurants, requesting their “tips.” Tatsumi has collected over 13, 000 and a selection of 8, 000 was recently exhibited in Tokyo. See more images below or on his website Japanese Tip!

 

Yuki Tatsumi

Japanese Tip: An Exhibition of 8,000 Chopstick Sleeve Sculptures Left Behind at Restaurants

Yuki Tatsumi was working as a waiter in a restaurant when one day, as he was cleaning up a table, he noticed that a customer had intricately folded up the paper chopstick sleeve and left it behind. Japan doesn’t have a culture of tipping but Tatsumi imagined that this was a discreet, subconscious method of showing appreciation. He began paying attention and sure enough noticed that other customers were doing the same thing. Tatsumi began collecting these “tips” which eventually led to his art project: Japanese Tip.

Since 2012, Tatsumi has not only been collecting his own tips but he’s reached out to restaurants and eateries all across Japan communicating his concept and asking them to send him their tips. The response has been enormous. He’s collected over 13,000 paper sculptures that range from obscure and ugly to intricate and elaborate.

left at a restaurant in Kochi

Earlier this month, Tatsumi staged an exhibition in Tokyo where he displayed 8,000 of some of the most interesting sculptures sourced from all 47 prefectures around Japan. “Japanese Tip is a project between restaurants and customers,” says Tatsumi, “to communicate the ‘appreciation for food’ and ‘appreciation of the service’ by using the most common material used at any Japanese restaurant.”

The exhibition has since closed but you can see some of the paper sculptures on his website and you can follow the initiative on Facebook. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

left at a cafe in Mie

Editor Pick: Samuel Shumway

Delectable paper meals by NYC-based artist Samuel Shumway. Discovered via our Submissions platform and selected as an Editor Pick. See more images below.

 

Samuel Shumway

Artist Spotlight: Barlo

New work from Hong Kong-based artist Gian Barlo aka Barlo (previously featured here), including a new wall for the Porwli by Nature festival in Port Luis, Mauritius. As he shared with us:

“It was a bit of a mission with the street being very messy and was painted over 4 crazy nights. Despite that I am pretty happy with the result and I think it summarizes the exploration of my last year of painting (and drawing) both in studio and outdoor.”

See more images of the mural as well as a lovely black and gold studio series below!

 

Gian Barlo

 

 

Cristian Marianciuc Creates a New Decorated Origami Paper Crane Daily for 1,000 Days

When we last mentioned origami enthusiast Cristian Marianciuc he had just completed the creative challenge of designing a new decorative origami crane daily for 365 days. But then… he didn’t stop. For nearly three years, Marianciuc continued to produce a vast flock of 1,000 paper birds decorated with all manner of leaves, beads, thread, flowers, feathers, and other materials too numerous to list. You can explore all of them on Instagram and a few of his paper works are available on Etsy.