Posts in Category: churches

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

Breathtaking Interior Images of Copenhagen’s Rare Expressionist Church

Copenhagen’s Grundtvig’s Church is a rare example of expressionist church architecture, and one of the most well-known churches in the Danish city. French photographer Ludwig Favre was attracted to the perpendicular lines that compose the early 20th-century structure, in addition to the nearly six million yellow bricks that fill its interior. Favre decided to shoot the building’s 1800-seat congregation, capturing the minimal ornamentation found in the famous church’s massive vaulted halls and nave.

Favre is a photographer that specializes in major city landscapes, and has a history of shooting interiors, including his work at the La Sorbonne, and other cultural destinations around Paris. You can see more of his images on Instagram and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

An Architectural Study of a Norwegian Cathedral Facade Animated From a Single Photo

Animator Ismael Sanz-Pena has brought the sculptural facade of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim, Norway to life through a unique continuous motion animation that uses just one photograph. Sanz-Pena’s pairing of the video with a lively, fast-paced Liberian field recording of chants, cheers, and drumming adds an extra element of vitality. The artist described his process to Colossal:

The idea behind the film was to find the innate movement inherit in still forms. Every sculpture has movement in it, and it is the task of the animator to discover it. It was through the process of editing my imagery that I discovered that a single image would suffice to create the animation. The film was made by zooming into the image and panning row by row while making sure that different architectural motives aligned in every increment. This also gave a structure to the film.

Originally hailing from Spain, Sanz-Pena has studied and worked in the field of animation around the world and is currently an assistant professor of animation at the Kansas City Art Institute.

A Virtual Reality Sky Projected Above a Parisian Church by Artist Miguel Chevalier


Projected onto the ceiling of Saint-Eustache Church in Paris, Voûtes Célestes is a work by Miguel Chevalier that turned the ancient chapel into the backdrop for a constantly morphing sky chart produced in real time. Cycling through 35 different colored networks, the ceiling glowed with each successive pattern, highlighting the grand architecture that laid below the swirling universes above.

The work, accompanied by musical improvisations played by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard on the organ, was produced for Nuit Blanche 2016 on the first of October. Visitors to the virtual reality artwork were invited to wander or lie down beneath the false sky above, aesthetically immersed in a wash of sonic and visual splendor.

Chevalier was born in Mexico City in 1959 and has lived in Paris since 1985. His work has focused almost exclusively on the digital since the late 1970s, often combining themes such as nature and artifice. You can see a more of his work on his website, and a video of his Paris installation below. (via designboom)








This Solemn Forest Chapel in Japan Imitates Two Hands Clasped in Prayer


Located in a forest just beyond a denominational cemetery sits the Sayama Forest Chapel, a three-year-old building designed by Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP (previously). From a bird’s eye view the chapel appears to form both a star and two hands pressed together in prayer, which is a traditional Japanese structural form called “Gassho-zukuri.”

“For those who are in deep grief and inconsolable, how can architecture nurture them? With this in mind, I designed buildings that gently surround them and support their intentions,” explained Nakamura to Yellowtrace.

The building was also built in a way to promote growth around its exterior, with walls tilted inward to leave room for the forest to grow around its shape. The chapel’s floor and patterns of its slate also lean toward the forest, subtly asking visitors to concentrate their mind on the surrounding elements of nature.

The chapel was named as a winner in the religious buildings and memorials category in this year’s Architizer A+Awards, an awards program that celebrates the year’s best in architecture and products. (via Yellowtrace)








A Lone Man Spends 53 Years Building a Cathedral by Hand

Since 1963, a man named Justo Gallego has dedicated his life to building a cathedral on the outskirts of Madrid almost entirely by himself. Despite the lack of any formal training in construction or architecture, Gallego has continued work on the giant church into his 90s and works on it even today. Driven solely by his faith, he admits the project will never be finished in his lifetime and he has yet to make plans for what happens after he dies. Great Big Story gives us a quick glimpse of this unusual man and his towering cathedral.






The Floor of an Historic Church Transformed Into a Reflective Pool of Multi-Colored Orbs by Liz West


All images by Hannah Devereux

Reflecting the architecture of the former St. John’s Church in North Lincolnshire, UK is Liz West‘s site-specific pool of over 700 multi-colored orbs titled “Our Colour Reflection.” These circular mirrors installed onto the floor of the now 20-21 Visual Arts Centre project hues of yellow, purple, red, blue, and 11 other colors onto the beams that surround them, adding a colorful dimension to the 125-year-old building.

“The work changes constantly, depending on what time of day it is,” West told The Creators Project. “As darkness comes, the gallery spotlights reflect off the colored mirrors and send vivid dots of color up into the interior of the former church building, illuminating the neo-Gothic architecture.”

Visitors can peer into the reflective pool to see how it refracts their own image, inserting themselves simultaneously into the history and artistic intervention of the space. The installation is also a reference to stained glass, as West focused on the history of the arts center as a former place of worship before starting the installation. You can catch the multi-colored light refractions of “Our Colour Reflection” through June 25, 2016. (via The Creators Project)


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Okuda San Miguel Wraps a Moroccan Church in a Vibrant Geometric Mural


All images courtesy of Ink and Movement

After covering a church turned skatepark in Spain with his signature style of murals, Okuda San Miguel (previously) has now transformed an abandoned Moroccan church into a 360-degree mural titled “11 Mirages to Freedom.” The street artist covered the structure in geometric bears, birds, and human faces, produced as a part of the British Council‘s Street Art Caravane Initiative. Working with the architecture already in place, San Miguel painted each of the building’s eleven faces while incorporating the structure’s barred windows. These he formed into bird cages, hats, and masks that are seamlessly incorporated…as long as you don’t look into the barred openings.

The church is uniformly painted in a brilliant shade of yellow, with smaller architectural details painted in equally vibrant colors. You can see more of San Miguel’s murals in the video Infinite World included below, as well as on the artist’s Instagram. (via Web Urbanist)