Posts in Category: hyperrealism

Unusual Animals Brought Together in New Hyperrealistic Paintings by Lisa Ericson

Flock

New work from Lisa Ericson (previously) continues the Portland-based artist’s hyperrealistic compositions of animals. Set on deep black backgrounds, her paintings showcase unusual combinations of peacefully co-existing fauna. Pelicans support rabbits, snakes, and ocelots, while tree frogs and songbirds find homes on the shells of turtles. Her most recent paintings are on view through May 25 at Antler Gallery in Portland, in a show titled Invisible Promise, alongside work from Scottish artist Lindsey Carr. You can see more from Ericson on Instagram.

After The Flood

Stowaway

Distant Shore

Uneasy Truce

Oasis

Haven

The Vulnerable Oil Paintings of Aleah Chapin

Aleah Chapin’s vulnerable figures exist within a spectrum of emotions: joy, contemplating, stoicism. Yet, in each, the painter has the ability to tie our natural states to nature itself, often crafting lush environments for her subjects. The artist is particularly influenced by the region she inhabited in her youth.

Ron Mueck’s New Installation Comprised of 100 Massive Skulls

Ron Mueck crafted 100 individual, enormous skulls for a new installation at National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial. The sculptures in "Mass" are crafted from fiberglass and resin, and each is about a meter high. Mueck's hyperrealist work was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Towering Hyperrealistic Cactus Paintings by Lee Kwang-ho

Cactus No.95, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Korean painter Kwang-ho Lee (previously) depicts larger-than-life cacti in oil paintings that stand up to 8-feet tall. Every thorn, bloom, and branch is painted with excruciating accuracy, bringing the most minute elements into hyperrealistic focus. Lee studied painting at Seoul National University and is represented by Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1266, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 6202, 2016. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1212, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 93, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 91, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 92, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 98, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Giant Dabs of Thick Oil Paint Captured as Hyperrealist Colored Pencil Drawings

Australian artist Cj Hendry (previously) tricks the eye with her hyper-realistic drawings, works that recreate the appearance of thick swabs of brightly colored paint. To achieve the dimensionality and sheen of fresh oil paint she layers dry pigment atop colored pencil, accurately portraying the liquid medium’s viscosity.

The series, Complimentary Colors, is far different than the artist’s previous style, which for several years had been exclusively black and white. You can view pieces from her past and present, as well as a series of billboard-sized works, on the artist’s Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

Ruben Orozco’s Eerily Realistic Sculptures

Using silicone, wood, resin, actual hair, and marble, Mexican sculptor Ruben Orozco crafts realistic depictions of famous figures. Created in varying scales, these entrancing figures have gone viral for their eerie reflection of humanity. He's created sculptures depicting Frida Kahlo, Pope Francis, and other historical figures. The work may remind you of other sculptors of realistic figures, like Ron Mueck and Kazuhiro Tsuji.

Larger-Than-Life Hyperrealistic Portraits Rendered in Graphite and Charcoal by Arinze Stanley

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Nigerian artist Arinze Stanley works with graphite and charcoal pencils on large sheets of cartridge paper to render enormous portraits of his subjects. Spending upwards of 200 hours on an artwork, Stanley agonizes over the most minute details of each piece to painstakingly capture reflections of light, droplets of sweat, or tangles of hair.

Where some hyperrealistic artists lean towards idealized perfection, Stanley instead focuses on pure realism, infusing portraits with a raw sense of emotion and drama. The scale of each piece, always slightly larger than life, adds an uncanny three-dimensional aspect.

Stanley recently exhibited work at Omenka Gallery and you can see more of his works (and pieces in progress) on Facebook. (via ARTNAU, Juxtapoz)

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

Desolation, 2016. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Desolation, 2016. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

FAMISHED (Disturbia series), 2016. Progress photo.

FAMISHED (Disturbia series), 2016. 26″ x 36″. Graphite and charcoal on Cartridge paper.

Innocence, 2016. 33” X 23.4″. White and black charcoal pencils and graphite pencils on Lambeth Cartridge paper.

Hyperrealistic Paintings of Bulging, Decorative Rugs by Antonio Santin

"corona" (2015), oil on canvas, 59x98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

“corona” (2015), oil on canvas, 59×98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

Antonio Santin produces works that are nearly impossible to identify as paintings, hyperrealistic depictions of decorative rugs covered in complex floral arrangements and patterns. Each piece is composed of thousands of paint strokes that mimic the texture of a rug’s weave, thick segments of oil paint that transform his nearly five-foot long canvases.

Adding another layer of difficulty to the detailed paintings, Santin includes bulges and creases that appear to obscure large masses beneath his 2D surfaces. Previously working with still lifes, Santin told The Creators Project that the rugs were a way for him to get rid of the figure within his works while still holding on to the outline of its shape. He calls his rug series “figurative paintings without a figure,” eerie pieces that give an illusion of a body hidden beneath the surface.

The New York-based artist was born in Madrid, Spain in 1978, and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2005. You can see more of his rug paintings on his website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

“alicia” (2014), oil on canvas, 73×110 inches

"flushing meats" (2014), oil on canvas, 56x98 inches

“flushing meats” (2014), oil on canvas, 56×98 inches

"festland" (2014), oil on canvas, 52x97 inches

“festland” (2014), oil on canvas, 52×97 inches

"incest coin" (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

“incest coin” (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

"dystopian blues" (2014), oil on canvas, 78x90 inches

“dystopian blues” (2014), oil on canvas, 78×90 inches

"Claire" (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

“Claire” (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

"Claire" (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

“Claire” (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches