Posts in Category: light

Artist Spotlight: James Nizam

Recent series by Vancouver-based artist James Nizam (previously featured here). When we asked him to describe the technique used here he said he “basically turned a camera into a 3 axis plotter that uses a combination of motorized movements with in-camera shutter sequences all in play with the axial rotation of the earth. Essentially extruding points of starlight into line drawings.”

See more from “Starlight Drawing” below.

 

James Nizam

An Illuminated Niagara Falls Captured in a January Freeze by Adam Klekotka

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

All images © Adam Klekotka, Licensed for use on Colossal

Toronto-based photographer Adam Klekotka had visited Niagara Falls several times during his time in Canada, but never journeyed to the massive waterfall during winter. After two weeks of record-setting temperatures this January (which led the Canadian news to report that parts of the country were colder than the surface of Mars) Klekotka decided to explore the icy waterfall at night, discovering an illuminated scene that appeared more like a deserted alien landscape than natural wonder.

“The temperature was about -20C, but due to cold wind and high humidity, it felt like it was way below -30C,” Klekotka told Colossal. “After some time of shooting, my hands were really frostbitten. Because of the small buttons in the cameras, I had to handle them without gloves. Additionally the drops of water were freezing on the front glass of the lens and I had to clean it every couple of seconds.”

Klekotka captured the glowing waterfall from several angles, including an observation deck encrusted with a thick layer of icicles. You can see more of Klekotka’s otherworldly images on his Instagram and browse a selection of his small prints on his online shop. (via Colossal Submissions)

New Sparkling Blooms Photographed with Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence by Craig Burrows

Photographer Craig Burrows (previously) continues to explore a unique photography method called ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence that uses high-intensity UV lights to excite fluorescence found in some plants, animals, and various objects. Burrows chooses to focus on flowers, creating colorfully vivid interpretations of jade blooms, daisies, and irises that seem to practically glow from within. You can follow more of his work on Flickr.

New Sparkling Blooms Photographed with Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence by Craig Burrows

Photographer Craig Burrows (previously) continues to explore a unique photography method called ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence that uses high-intensity UV lights to excite fluorescence found in some plants, animals, and various objects. Burrows chooses to focus on flowers, creating colorfully vivid interpretations of jade blooms, daisies, and irises that seem to practically glow from within. You can follow more of his work on Flickr.

Foods Distorted Through Liquid and Glass in Photographs by Suzanne Saroff

All photos © Suzanne Saroff.

In her ongoing series titled Perspective, photographer Suzanne Saroff creates fractured and skewed images of common foods as seen through vessels filled with water and glass objects. The images play with concepts of light and shadow resulting in distorted still lifes that appear almost like digital glitches. “With tools and techniques such as refraction, directional light, and bold colors, my photographs give everyday items alternate visual avenues of expression,” shares Saroff. “Taking shape via shadows or fragmentations, my subjects often become more than the singular and expected version of themselves.”

Saroff was born Missoula, Montana and now lives and works in New York where she shoots for a variety of brands. You can follow more of her photography on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

Explosive Light-Based Installations by Adela Andea

Romanian-born artist Adela Andea creates futuristic light installations that range from wall-based works to immersive environments. The pieces appears as lit explosions, with LED lights, magnifying lenses, and flex neon springing outwards in a blend of chaos and control. Despite their composition of electrified material, each work is inspired by a natural phenomena. Andea looks to bioluminescent sea life, melting icebergs, and cosmological events to shape the composition and meaning of her large-scale installations.

Andea is currently represented by Anya Tish Gallery in Houston and Cris Worley Fine Arts in Dallas. You can see more of her neon-based installations on her website. (via The Jealous Curator)

“Dandelion Light” by Artist Duy Anh Nhan Duc

Ho Chi Minh-born, Paris-based artist Duy Anh Nhan Duc highlights the delicacy of the dandelion puff with a luminous sculpture made with glass globes and gold-plated brass. See more images and video below.
 

A Concept Dance Performance Incorporating a Plane of 640 Motorized LED Spheres

2047 Apologue is a concept performance by Chinese director Zhang Yimou, the director of the opening and closing ceremonies for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The video is a teaser for the final part of the show titled the Weaving Machine, one of eight acts that combine traditional Chinese craft, music, or dance with modern technology such as lasers, robots, and drones. The combination of ancient and modern technology aims to comment on how much the later has taken over life in the 21st century.

For this particular segment Zhang places an ancient Chinese weaving machine on stage with 640 kinetic LED spheres designed and produced by WHITEvoid. Moving together in an elegant wave, the lights interact with a dancer performing underneath. Throughout the segment the lights change both pattern and color, as a soundtrack matches their increasing energy and movement.

The performance premiered at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing this past June and will tour China throughout 2018.  You can see the full teaser video for the Weaving Machine above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)