Posts in Category: japan

The World’s Largest LEGO Cherry Blossom Tree Blooms in Japan

A record-breaking LEGO tree has taken shape at LEGOLAND Japan, a theme park in Nagoya dedicated to the beloved plastic bricks. The cherry tree’s construction marks the theme park’s first anniversary, and has been registered as the “largest LEGO brick cherry blossom tree” in the Guinness Book of World Records. It was made with 881,470 bricks which took over 6,500 hours to assemble. Superlatives aside, the hand-built tree is a spectacular sight to behold. The tree sculpture includes a grassy green base and illuminated lanterns, all made with LEGO bricks. You can watch a video of the tree’s creation below. (via My Modern Met)

A Sneak Peak at the Studio Ghibli Theme Park

Mockups of the Studio Ghibli theme park, set to open on a 200-hectare plot in Japan’s Aichi prefecture in 2022. Based on the Studio Ghibli-founder Hayao Miyazaki’s imaginary universes come to life. The world-renowned animator is the brain behind masterpieces like Spirited Away and Howl’s Moving Castle and has developed a huge following both in Japan and abroad.

The park will take up , which will be transformed into a number of Hayao Miyazaki’s fantastical worlds and will include

Features: a Victorian-era house from Howl’s Moving Castle shrouded in trees and a Princess Mononoke village surrounded by forest trails and large green areas.

Big Ghibli Playhouse, which will include a children’s playground, exhibition areas and small cinemas for film screenings.

rides inspired by My Neighbour Totoro, Howl’s Moving Castle and Princess Mononoke.

See more images below.

 

Studio Ghibli

‘Future Flowers’ Blossom in a Digital Collaboration Presented at Japan’s Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine

For the Hanami 2050 exhibition in Fukuoka, Japan, Danish floral designer Nicolai Bergmann collaborated with the Tokyo-based design firm Onesal to create a series of dazzling botanical animations. The works were created under the concept of “future flowers,” and explore creations from deep within the designers’ imaginations. Fantastical and brightly colored buds burst into bloom with a satisfying crack and sizzle, presenting arrangements that appear like a cross between a botanical garden and extraterrestrial forest.

The looping presentations were displayed on screens embedded in real foliage arranged by Bergmann, and sprung to life at the historic Shinto shrine Dazaifu Tenmangu (太宰府天満宮) from March 29 to April 1, 2018. You can see a video, and several clips, from the recent installation below.

 

The Blinged-Out Work Trucks of Japan Photographed by Todd Antony

For more than 40 years Japanese truck drivers have been piling on lights, patterned fabrics, and other over-the-top adornments to their work trucks, creating moving masterpieces covered in LEDs. This tradition of decorated trucks or “Dekotora” originated from a 1970s Japanese movie series inspired by Smokey and the Bandit titled Torakku Yaro or “Truck Rascals.” Drivers first began decorating their vehicles in the style of the comedy-action films in hopes of being cast in upcoming films. Eventually the extravagant trucks became a way of life for many workers, with decoration costs to produce such elaborate vehicles sometimes running over $100,000.

Although the art form is now seeing a decline after it reached its peak in the ’80s and ’90s, the Utamaro-Kai Association of Dekotora drivers has begun to help raise funds for various charity initiatives, including areas of the country that have been hit by the recent Tsunami. Photographer Todd Antony‘s latest photographic series documents the men behind the association, taking a peek inside their cabs to view the personalization that goes into each piece of machinery. You can view more of Antony’s recent projects on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Japanese-Designed Public Restrooms in the Shape of Fish, Crabs, Tree Stumps

Flickr user and photographer Okinawa Soba (Rob) has been documenting the obscure designs of public restroom facilities on the Japanese island of Okinawa for the last six years. Rob has lived on the island, which is home to 1.3 million residents, for nearly 43 years, and has had the chance to explore some of the stranger bathrooms the prefecture has to offer. Included in this group is a koi-shaped bathroom which asks guests to enter through the mouth, a sliced orange, a stubby trunk with windows that have replaced its missing branches, and a robotic crab. You can see more of Rob’s unique Japanese finds (including these Okinawa manhole covers) on his photostream. (via Web Urbanist)

Japanese-Designed Public Restrooms in the Shape of Fish, Crabs, Tree Stumps

Flickr user and photographer Okinawa Soba (Rob) has been documenting the obscure designs of public restroom facilities on the Japanese island of Okinawa for the last six years. Rob has lived on the island, which is home to 1.3 million residents, for nearly 43 years, and has had the chance to explore some of the stranger bathrooms the prefecture has to offer. Included in this group is a koi-shaped bathroom which asks guests to enter through the mouth, a sliced orange, a stubby trunk with windows that have replaced its missing branches, and a robotic crab. You can see more of Rob’s unique Japanese finds (including these Okinawa manhole covers) on his photostream. (via Web Urbanist)

Interactive Culinary Embroideries by Ipnot

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot creates pieces of food and drink that seem to leap off of the fabric and into life. Ipnot enhances the realism of her embroideries by staging them with their real-life inspirations and surroundings, like piles of fluffy rice in a bowl, and slices of stollen crumbling off a miniature fork. Ipnot shares on her website that her grandmother’s embroidery practice inspired her to start, and she uses the needle and thread similarly to the painting technique of stippling. You can see more of the artist’s petite embroideries on Instagram. (via Spoon & Tamago).

Laser-Cut Note Pad Blocks Gradually Reveal Hidden Objects

Ingenious note pad designs by Triad, a Japanese company that makes architectural models. The Omoshiro Block (or “fun block”) is made with laser-cutting technology and contains hidden objects and scenes that only become visible as the note paper is used. Emerging almost like an excavated treasure from an archeological dig, some of the more elaborate versions feature notable Japanese architecture like Kyoto’s Kiyomizudera Temple and Tokyo Tower. See more images below!